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Best Crochet Hooks for Beginners: Our Top Picks

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One of the joys of picking up a new hobby is shopping for tools! In this article, we’ll discuss the different types of crochet hooks available and which will best meet your needs as a beginner crocheter. While choosing the best crochet hooks as a beginner might feel daunting, you can’t go wrong with any of the hooks included on this list.

variety of aluminum crochet hooks on a gray background

Best Crochet Hooks for Beginners

As a crochet blogger and teacher, I’ve had the pleasure of working with many different types of crochet hooks over the years. I also know how important it is for beginners to find the right tool when learning how to crochet.

So in this article, I’ll share my experience and expertise to help you navigate the world of crochet hooks, focusing on the best options for beginners.

Summary: Our Top Picks for Best Crochet Hooks

Best Ergonomic Hooks: Clover Amour.

These brightly colored crochet hooks have soft, comfortable handles that are easy to grip. They have smooth aluminum or plastic tips, depending on the size.

Best Affordable Aluminum Hooks: Susan Bates Silvalume Aluminium Crochet Hooks. 

These hooks have a super smooth aluminum surface and an inline shape that reduces wrist motion and helps you maintain a consistent gauge.

Best Wooden Hooks: WeCrochet Radiant Wood Hooks.

These hooks have a beautiful, smooth finish with just the right amount of grip – so you don’t have to worry about your stitches slipping off. They also have a deeply grooved hook, which can give beginners a greater sense of control.

My favorite type of hook? I learned through a lot of experimentation that I prefer metal-tipped hooks with thicker, ergonomic handles – like the Clover Amour or Tulip Etimo lines. The wider handles are easier to hold, and help me avoid the wrist pain that I sometimes get with the thinner metal handles.

Anatomy of a Crochet Hook

Understanding the different parts of a crochet hook can help you choose the right one for your needs. In this section, we’ll break down the anatomy of a crochet hook so that you can familiarize yourself with the essential parts.

gold crochet hook on a gray background labeled with parts of a crochet hook

Head: The head, or hooked end, is the part of the hook you’ll insert into your work to create stitches. The head can be rounded, pointed, or in-between, depending on the brand and style.

Throat: The throat is the part of the hook immediately after the head. This is the part of the hook that “catches” the yarn as you make stitches. The throat can be inline (straight) or tapered (rounded) in shape.

Shaft: The shaft, sometimes called the shank, is the section of the crochet hook between the throat and the handle. The shaft’s diameter determines the size of your stitches. This part of the hook is also known as the working area because it holds your stitches as you work. It can be longer or shorter, depending on the brand. 

Grip: The grip, or thumb grip, is the part of the crochet hook that you’ll hold while crocheting. It may have a flattened or textured surface for better control and comfort. Ergonomic crochet hooks often have larger cushioned grips.

Handle: The handle is the end part of the crochet hook. Handles can be thick or thin, longer or shorter, depending on the brand.

Types of Crochet Hooks

Crochet hooks come in many shapes and sizes, from tiny steel hooks used to make delicate lace to large wooden hooks and plastic hooks used to make chunky blankets and cold-weather accessories.

When it comes to crochet hooks, there are several factors to consider, including material, hook shape, and handle style. Let’s explore these in more detail.

Crochet Hook Material

  1. Aluminum hooks – As a beginner, you can’t go wrong with aluminum hooks. They’re lightweight, durable, and glide easily through yarn. Some popular brands include Susan Bates and Boye.
  2. Plastic hooks – While plastic hooks are affordable and lightweight, they may not be as durable as aluminum hooks. However, if you’re on a tight budget, Susan Bate’s Luxite or Boye’s plastic hooks can be a decent starting point.
  3. Wood hooks – These hooks are warm, comfortable, and visually appealing. They can also be a little pricy. Furls Odyssey and WeCrochet are well-known brands that carry wooden hooks.
  4. Steel – These hooks are mainly used for fine thread work and are not typically recommended for beginners.

Hook Shape

  1. Inline – These hooks have a straight throat and a sharp point. The deep hook of an inline hook holds the yarn securely, reducing the risk of dropped loops. Some beginners find that inline hooks provide more control over their stitches, making it easier to maintain consistent tension. If this appeals to you, try Susan Bates Silvalume hooks.
  2. Tapered – These hooks have a rounded point and a gradual, tapered shaft. Tapered hooks tend to glide more smoothly through the stitches without splitting and snagging their yarn. On the other hand, some crocheters find the tapered hook harder to work with because the rounded tip is hard to insert between the stitches. Boye is a favorite brand for tapered hooks.
three crohet hooks on a gray background
3 hook styles: tapered hook, inline hook, ergonomic hook

Handle Style

  1. Standard Crochet Hooks: These handles are the traditional, straight style you’ll find on the shelves of most craft stores. Usually made from aluminum, standard hooks have a straight shaft with a tapered or inline hook at the end. They’re simple, functional, and affordable, but are not the most comfortable for extended use. Susan Bates and Boye are popular brands that offer standard handles.
  2. Ergonomic Crochet Hooks: These handles are designed for comfort and ease of use, especially for those who crochet for long periods or have hand issues. The ergonomic hook features a rounded or cushioned hook handle with either a tapered or inline hook. These hooks generally come at a higher price point, so some beginners purchase standard hooks and later upgrade to ergonomic hooks. Clover Amour and Tulip Etimo are some of our favorite ergonomic style hooks.

Choosing the Best Crochet Hooks for You

Now that we’ve explored the different types of crochet hooks, let’s focus on the best options for beginners. As we make recommendations, we’ll focus on comfort, durability, and ease of use – all important factors for new crocheters.

Ergonomic Crochet Hooks

These comfortable hooks are available in a wide range of sizes and price points.

assortment of ergonomic crochet hooks on a gray background
Clover Amour hooks

1. Clover Amour 

The Clover Amour ergonomic hooks are superior to both Susan Bates and Boye in the smoothness of the aluminum and the comfort of the handle. Each hook handle is slightly wider than average and color-coded by size. They are polished to perfection, facilitating quick, smooth stitching. This high-quality tapered hook set with last for many years. 

  • Type: Hyrbid
  • Material: Aluminum with plastic handle
  • Availability: online or in most craft stores
  • Sizes: Many
  • Set: Available 
  • Price: Mid
  • Pros: Easy to find, reliable, very well made
  • Cons: A little more expensive than other brands
  • Check Price

2. Tulip Etimo

  • Hook Shape: Hybrid
  • Material: Aluminum with plastic handle
  • Availability: Easy to find, including here online
  • Sizes: Many
  • Set: Available
  • Price: Mid
  • Pros: Comfortable, reliable 
  • Cons: A little more expensive than other brands
  • Check Price

3. Furls Streamline Hooks

You can’t get too far into the online crochet community without stumbling across the popular Furls hooks. These high-quality hooks come at a premium price, but they come with a generous return and replacement policy.

  • Type: Hybrid
  • Materials: Wood and Resin
  • Availability: online 
  • Sizes: Many
  • Set: Not available 
  • Price: High
  • Pros: Extremely comfortable
  • Cons: More expensive than other brands
  • Check Price

Standard Hooks

4 colorful metal crochet hooks
Boye hooks

Remember, these are simple, budget-friendly hooks without ergonomic handles. 

1. Boye Simplicity Aluminum Hooks

You can find this popular brand in most craft stores. Available in a wide range of sizes, these tapered hooks can be used for any project.

  • Hook Shape: Tapered
  • Material: Aluminum
  • Availability: Easy to find, including here online
  • Sizes: Many
  • Set: Available
  • Price: Low
  • Pros: Easy to find, reliable 
  • Cons: Inexpensive aluminum wears out with extended use, not consistently smooth
  • Check Price
6 color crochet hooks of different sizes on a gray background
Bates hooks

2. Susan Bates Silvalume Hooks

This leader of the inline crochet hook category is also available in an equally wide variety of sizes as its Boye counterpart. These budget-friendly hooks can be purchased individually or as a complete set. 

  • Hook Shape: Inline
  • Material: Aluminum
  • Availability: Easy to find
  • Sizes: Many
  • Set: Available
  • Price: Low
  • Pros: Easy to find, reliable 
  • Cons: Inexpensive aluminum wears out with extended use, not consistently smooth
  • Check Price
colorful wooden crochet hooks on a gray background
WeCrochet wooden hooks

3. Radiant Wood Crochet Hooks by WeCrochet

If you want to branch out of the aluminum hook category, but want to stick with something standard, check out the beautiful Radiant Wood crochet hook set by We Crochet. This elegant wooden hook set features a full complement of inline crochet hooks. While this set is priced higher than other standard sets, the quality and beauty of these hooks set them apart from the competition. 

  • Hook Shape: Inline
  • Material: Wood
  • Availability: through WeCrochet Only
  • Sizes: many
  • Price: Mid
  • Set: available 
  • Pros: easy to find, reliable 
  • Cons: Wood drags on rougher yarn

What about store-brand crochet hooks?

Most craft stores offer their own brand of crochet hooks. Hobby Lobby offers a variety of styles in its Yarnology brand, just like Michael’s offers in its Loops and Threads brand. These store-brand items are only available in-store or on that store’s website. These hooks are similar in quality to Boye or Susan Bates but are a step down from Clover Amour or Tulip Etimo. 

What about inexpensive hooks from Amazon?

A quick search on Amazon will yield a multitude of options, but many of them lack the quality of the brands listed above. Take this set, for example. While it looks similar to the ergonomic sets by Clover, the metal of the hook head is not polished well, which can snag the yarn as you crochet. The extra tension often results in projects that come out the wrong size or wrist discomfort that leads to injury. Selecting a quality set of hooks will facilitate your learning experience as you explore the crocheting craft. 

In Review: Our Top Picks

While choosing the best crochet hooks as a beginner might feel daunting, you can’t go wrong with any of the hooks included on this list.

Best Ergonomic Hooks: Clover Amour

These brightly colored crochet hooks have soft, comfortable handles that are easy to grip. They have smooth aluminum or plastic tips, depending on the size.

Runner up: Tulip Etimo

These ergonomic hooks are fantastic as well, just a little harder to find.

Best Affordable Aluminum Hooks: Susan Bates Silvalume Aluminium Crochet Hooks 

These hooks have a super smooth aluminum surface and an inline shape that reduces wrist motion and helps you maintain a consistent gauge.

Best Wooden Hooks: Furls Streamline Wood Crochet Hooks

Made from sustainably sourced solid wood, these hooks have a beautiful, smooth finish with just the right amount of grip – so you don’t have to worry about your stitches slipping off. They also have a thicker, ergonomic handle, which can give beginners a greater sense of control.

I hope this guide helps you find the perfect crochet hook to start your crafting journey. Remember, the most important thing is to find a hook that feels comfortable and works well for you. Feel free to experiment and try different options until you find your ideal match.

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photo of several different crochet hooks against light background, with text overlay that reads, "Best Crochet Hook Guide. Top Picks for Beginners."

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