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How to Crochet: 6 Basic Crochet Stitches for Beginners

Crocheting is a fun hobby that anyone can learn! In this beginner’s guide, I’ll show you how to crochet the six most common crochet stitches that new crocheters need to learn.

These are the must-know stitches that you’ll see in almost every pattern. They’re not too difficult, and once you learn how to do them, it will be easy for you to pick up new patterns and make your own crochet creations!

If you’re ready to get started on your crochet journey, you’re in the right place. These easy crochet stitches are a good foundation for improving crochet skills as a new crocheter. Keep reading to learn how to make the 6 basic crochet stitches for beginners.

a swatch of double crochet fabric made with dark blue crochet yarn with a pink and gray crochet hook

Basic Crochet Stitches

In this article, we’ll talk about the six essential crochet stitches that every beginner needs to know. And you’re in luck, because these six basic crochet stitches are easy to learn with a just little bit of practice.

These basic stitches are the building blocks of crochet. Once you’ve mastered these six beginner crochet stitches, you’ll be able to make just about any easy crochet pattern, like baby blankets, hats, and scarves.

This tutorial will teach you everything you need to know about crocheting and all of the most common stitches, which are:

  • The chain stitch
  • The single crochet stitch
  • The double crochet stitch
  • The half double crochet stitch
  • The treble crochet stitch
  • The slip stitch

We’ll walk through each stitch with easy-to-follow instructions and photos so that you can start creating beautiful projects right away. You’ll have your first project completed in no time!

For even more information about how to crochet, including how to hold the crochet hook and how to tie a slip knot, be sure to read: How to Crochet: A Complete Guide for Beginners

Note: This guide uses US crochet terms and demonstrates right-handed instructions. Read this handy conversion guide to learn the difference between British and American crochet terms.

a set of pink and purple crochet hooks with pink yarn in the background

Getting Started

The first step is to gather your favorite crochet supplies. For crochet beginners, I recommend using a smooth worsted weight yarn and an ergonomic hook in the corresponding hook size. (Check this crochet hook size chart if you’re not sure what size to pick.) Then, choose a ball of yarn in a lighter color to make it easier to see your stitches.

How to Crochet Chain Stitch

The crochet chain stitch is the first basic technique that all beginners need to know. The chain stitch is the simplest stitch on this list. Good thing, too, as it’s used as the starting point for almost all crochet patterns. 

Most patterns start with a number of chain stitches. A starting chain, or foundation chain, is a series of chain stitches that forms the foundation for the rest of the crochet project.

close up of crochet chain stitches made with teal yarn and a pink and gray crochet hook

To make a starting chain:

  1. Make a slip knot, and insert your hook.
  2. Yarn over and pull up a new loop.
  3. The first chain stitch is complete.
  4. Repeat to make the next chain stitch and the rest of the foundation chain.

Making chain stitches might feel tricky at first, but it will become second nature with a bit of practice.

You can also make chain stitches between other types of crochet stitches to make different patterns. For example, moss stitch is a beginner-friendly crochet stitch made from an alternating pattern of chain stitches and single crochet.

How to Single Crochet

The single crochet stitch is the next crochet stitch that beginners should learn. It’s a quick, easy stitch that’s super versatile in crochet patterns.

The single crochet stitch is abbreviated SC. In UK patterns, you will see it called double crochet.

Fabric made from single crochet stitches is smooth and solid. You can use single crochet to make all sorts of projects, including scarves, hats, and baby blankets. It’s also very popular for making amigurumi and crochet toys.

single crochet fabric in teal yarn with a pink and gray crochet hook

How to do single crochet:

  • If you are starting a new crochet swatch, make a slip knot and a beginning chain (foundation row).
  • Insert hook into the next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop.
  • Then, yarn over again and pull through both loops on the hook.

For a lot more information about the single crochet stitch, including how to increase, decrease, and work in the round, be sure to read this stitch guide: How to Single Crochet for Beginners.

How to Double Crochet

Next on our list of the basic crochet stitches is the double crochet stitch, abbreviated DC. Double crochet is a beginner-friendly stitch used in all sorts of patterns, like classic granny squares and afghans.

Double crochet is one of the taller stitches on our list. A double crochet stitch is taller than a single crochet stitch and a half-double stitch but shorter than a treble crochet stitch. Fabric made from double crochet stitches is a little more open and flexible than fabric made from plain single crochet.

a swatch of double crochet fabric made with dark blue crochet yarn with a pink and gray crochet hook

How to Make a Double Crochet

  1. Yarn over. Insert hook into the next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop.
  2. Yarn over and pull through two loops on the hook.
  3. Yarn over again and pull through both loops on the hook.

To learn how to work double crochet stitches, read this blog post: How to Double Crochet Stitch (dc) for Beginners.

How to Half Double Crochet

The half-double crochet stitch, abbreviated HDC, is another one of the six basic crochet stitches. In UK terms, it’s called a half treble crochet stitch.

Half Double Crochet is a simple stitch that’s easy to learn and fun to make– perfect for crocheting various projects from baby blankets to scarves or even sweaters!

The half-double crochet stitch is somewhat similar to the single crochet stitch. The difference is that the half-double crochet starts with one extra yarn-over at the beginning. That extra yarn-over makes half-double crochet taller than the single crochet, yet shorter than the double crochet stitch.

a swatch of half double crochet fabric made with teal blue crochet yarn with a pink and gray crochet hook

Here is how to make an HDC stitch:

  • Yarn over, and insert the hook into the next stitch.
  • Yarn over and pull up a loop.
  • Yarn over again, and pull the yarn through all three loops on the hook.

Click here for my detailed tutorial on how to crochet the half double crochet stitch. This article will teach you how to crochet the half-double crochet stitch and give you lots of tips for working with HDC stitches in patterns.

How to Treble Crochet

The treble crochet stitch is the tallest of the six basic crochet stitches. You may sometimes see it called the triple crochet stitch, or abbreviate as TR. In UK patterns, it’s called the double treble stitch.

The treble crochet stitch is the tallest stitch on our list of the six basic crochet stitches. With an extra yarn over, a treble stitch is even taller than a double crochet stitch. Once you learn the basic technique, you can add even more yarn-overs to make double-treble and triple treble stitches.

How to Make a Treble Crochet:

  1. Yarn over twice. Insert hook into the next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop.
  2. Yarn over and pull through the first two loops on the hook.
  3. Yarn over again and pull through the next two loops on the hook.
  4. Yarn over again and pull through the last two loops on the hook.

Treble crochet creates a looser fabric that drapes well. It’s often used in light, lacy, open patterns.

How to Crochet Slip Stitch

The slip stitch is the last on our list of essential crochet stitches. 

Slip stitch is a useful technique that can be used in so many different ways. You can use slip stitches to move the yarn across a row of stitches without too much height. You can also use a slip stitch to join a round of crochet into a circle by connecting the last stitch to the first stitch of that same round. Lastly, you can use the surface slip stitch technique to decorate crochet fabric.

a swatch of single crochet fabric made with teal crochet yarn embellished with lines of dark blue surgace crochet stitches

How to do a slip stitch in crochet:

  • Insert the hook into the next stitch, yarn over, and pull through the stitch and the active loop on the hook.

To learn all about slip stitch and how to make it, check out this full tutorial: How to Slip Stitch in Crochet (sl st) for Beginners.

Even More Crochet Stitches

Now that you know how to do all six basic crochet stitches, you’re ready to learn even more crochet stitches. 

One of the best things about crochet is that you can combine the basic stitches in different ways to create different crochet stitches. It’s possible to alternate basic stitches in different patterns to create all sorts of cool designs.

  • Some crochet stitches, like the moss stitch, are made from an alternating pattern of chain stitches and single crochet.
  • In the same way, crochet seed stitch is made from an alternating pattern of single and double crochet stitches.
finsihed crochet swatch of crochet moss stitch made with teal yarn and a pink and gray crochet hook

Other more advanced stitches you can learn to crochet include the shell stitch and the waffle stitch. You may also like advanced crochet stitches like the Elizabeth stitch, cluster stitch, or popcorn stitch.

Explore More Crochet Tutorials

When you’re ready for more crochet stitch tutorials, be sure to check out these related articles: 

I hope you enjoy learning these stitches! If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to leave a comment. Happy crocheting!

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I hope this article was useful for you! If you have any additional questions, feel free to join my Facebook Group. I created this group for you to share pictures, ask questions, and help each other out.

What’s Next?

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