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How to Treble Crochet Stitch (tr)

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The treble crochet stitch, sometimes called the triple crochet stitch, is a popular crochet stitch that you can use in a variety of crochet projects. In this post, we’ll show you how to treble crochet with clear written instructions and step-by-step photos.

So, if you’re ready to take your crocheting to new heights, keep reading to learn how to treble crochet!

swatch of treble crochet on a gray background with a pink handle crochet hook

Treble Crochet Stitch Basics

The treble crochet stitch, abbreviated TR, is one of the six basic crochet stitches. It’s a tall stitch that works quickly, creating a looser, airy fabric with a beautiful drape.

Briefly, here’s how to make a treble crochet. (Note: This tutorial uses US terms.)

  1. Yarn over twice. Insert the hook into the next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop.
  2. Yarn over, and pull through two loops.
  3. Yarn over, and pull through two loops.
  4. Yarn over, and pull through both loops on the hook.

If you want to learn more about the treble crochet stitch, keep reading. In this tutorial, I’ll provide an in-depth look at the treble crochet. We’ll discuss its anatomy, how to create it in rounds and rows, and how to increase or decrease. Additionally, I’ll answer some frequently asked questions about treble crochet and share some common mistakes to avoid.

Treble Crochet Stitch in Detail

Learning how to treble crochet is a valuable skill for any crocheter. It opens up a world of new possibilities for your projects and allows you to create more complex, beautiful designs.

Since it’s so tall, treble crochet creates a looser, more open fabric with a beautiful drape. Treble crochet looks great in a variety of projects, including blankets, scarves, and garments.

Abbreviation

In the US, this stitch is called treble crochet or triple crochet, and is abbreviated TR. In the UK, this stitch is called double treble crochet, and is abbreviated DTR.

Chart Symbol

In crochet charts, the treble crochet stitch is represented by a long T shape with two diagonal cross marks.

Skill Level

Easy. Once you know single crochet and double crochet, you’re ready to master treble crochet.

Height

A treble crochet stitch is a tall stitch – the tallest of the six basic stitches that beginners learn first. It’s taller than a double crochet but shorter than a double treble crochet.

Turning Chain

To start a new row of treble crochet, make a turning chain of 4 chain stitches. In most cases, the turning ch-4 counts as a stitch. That means you’ll make the first actual TR into the second stitch of the row.

Note: Some patterns might ask you to make a turning ch-3 instead of a turning ch-4. And rarely, some patterns may say that the turning chain does not count stitch. So, it’s always a good idea to read your pattern carefully!

second row of treble crochet worked in teal yarn and a pink crochet hook

How to Treble Crochet, Step-by-Step

Ready to learn how to treble crochet? Don’t worry; it’s not that complicated. Let’s make a swatch of treble crochet fabric so I can show you the following:

  • how to treble crochet into chain stitches
  • how to work treble crochet in rows 
  • how to work treble crochet in rounds
  • how to increase and decrease in treble crochet

Note: This tutorial uses US crochet terms and shows right-handed instructions.

Supplies

You’ll need a few basic materials to get started with treble crochet.

  • a crochet hook
  • yarn

You can use any size crochet hook and yarn that you like, but for this tutorial, I’ll be using a size G hook and worsted-weight yarn. I recommend choosing a smooth yarn in a light color to make it easier to see your stitches.

Step-by-step Instructions

Now, let’s move on to the step-by-step instructions for making a treble crochet stitch.

Foundation chain: Start by making a slip knot and chaining several stitches. To follow along with me, chain 14. This will create the foundation chain into which you’ll work your treble crochet stitches.

Make the first treble crochet:

  1. Yarn over the hook twice (this means wrapping the yarn around the hook from back to front two times). Your hook should now have three loops on it.
  2. Then, skip four chains and insert the hook into the fifth chain from the hook. (The four skipped chains count as the first stitch.)
  3. Then, yarn over again and pull up a loop. You should now have four loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again and pull through two loops. You should now have three loops remaining on your hook.
  5. Yarn over again and pull through two loops. You should now have two loops remaining on your hook.
  6. Finally, yarn over one last time and pull through the remaining two loops. Congratulations, you’ve just made your first treble crochet stitch!

Continue across the first row:

To continue working in treble crochet, repeat steps 2-7 in each subsequent stitch until you reach the end of the row. 

the first row of treble crochet in teal yarn with pink crochet hook on a gray background

When you have worked into the last chain, take a second to count your stitches. You should have eleven stitches (Remember, the four skipped chains at the beginning of the row count as a stitch!)

Continue working Row 2:

  1. To start the next row, turn your work and chain 4. The chain-4 counts as the first stitch of the second row. 
  2. Then continue working in treble crochet across the row. Skip the first stitch, and work the first treble crochet into the second stitch of the row. 
  3. Continue working a treble crochet into each stitch across the row. 
  4. Work the last treble crochet into the top of the turning chain from the previous row. 

When you count your stitches, you should have eleven stitches. (Remember, the turning chain counts as a stitch.

Note: It can be easy to forget the last stitch in the top of the turning chain. If you count your stitches and find that you’re missing a stitch, go back and double-check that you’ve remembered that step.

Treble Crochet in Rounds

Working treble crochet in rounds is not much different than working treble crochet in rows. Treble crochet is almost always done in joined rounds, not spiral (continuous) rounds.

To crochet treble crochet in joined rounds:

  1. Start by making a foundation chain. Then, join the first chain to the last with a slip stitch (this will create your first round).
  2. Next, chain 4. The turning chain counts as the first treble crochet of the round.
  3. Then, work the first treble crochet into the second stitch of the round.
  4. After crocheting the last stitch of the round, join it with a slip stitch to the first stitch of the round.
  5. Then, chain 4, and start the next round of treble crochet.

How to Increase in Treble Crochet

Increasing in treble crochet is quite simple. To increase in treble crochet, all you need to do is work two treble crochet stitches into the same stitch.

When reading crochet patterns, you’ll see treble crochet increases written as “tr inc” or sometimes “2 tr in next st”. Take the time to read the pattern notes to understand how the pattern designer writes a treble crochet increase.

treble crochet increase in teal yarn on a light background

How to Decrease in Treble Crochet

Decreasing in treble crochet is a little less simple, but still very doable. To decrease in treble crochet, you’ll need to work two stitches together.

When reading patterns, you’ll often see treble crochet decreases written “tr dec” or “tr2tog”, which stands for “treble crochet two together.”

Here’s how to make it:

  1. Insert the hook into the first stitch. Work a treble crochet until the last step, where two loops remain on the hook. Keep those two loops on the hook.
  2. Insert the hook into the next stitch. Work another treble crochet until the last step. At this point, there should be three loops on the hook.
  3. Then, yarn over and draw through all three loops on the hook. This completes a treble crochet decrease.

Variations on Treble Crochet

The basic treble crochet stitch is just the beginning. Once you can work a standard treble crochet, there are lots of variations to try—all with interesting textures or effects.

Here are some examples:

Extended Treble Crochet (etr): This is a taller variation on the standard treble crochet stitch. To make an ETR: Yarn over twice, insert the hook into the stitch, and pull up a loop. Yarn over and pull through FIRST LOOP only, (yarn over and pull through two loops) three times.

Front-Post Treble Crochet (fptr): This stitch is worked around the post of a stitch instead of in the top. To make an FPTR: Yarn over twice, insert the hook from front to back around the post of indicated stitch, and continue the treble stitch as usual.

Back-Post Treble Crochet (bptr): This stitch is worked around the post of a stitch, but from back to front. To make a BPTR: Yarn over twice, insert the hook from back to front around the post of indicated stitch, and continue the treble crochet stitch as usual.

Even Taller Crochet Stitches

If you’re looking for stitches even taller than the treble crochet, you’re in luck! There are several crochet stitches even taller than the treble crochet.

Double Treble Crochet (dtr): To make a DTR: Yarn over three times, insert the hook into the stitch, and pull up a loop. (Yarn over and pull through 2 loops) four times.

Triple Treble Crochet (ttr): To make a TTR: Yarn over four times, insert the hook into the stitch, and pull up a loop. (Yarn over and pull through 2 loops) five times.

Tips for Working Treble Crochet

As you practice, here are a few tips and tricks to help you master the treble crochet stitch. 

  • Use a stitch marker to mark the beginning of each row. This will help you keep track of where you are in the pattern and ensure that you’re working evenly. 
  • Pay attention to your tension. Make sure you keep an even tension throughout your work so that all of your stitches will be the same size and shape. Try to maintain a consistent tension as you crochet. This will help your stitches look neat and even.
  • Practice, practice, practice. The more you practice the treble crochet stitch, the better you’ll become at it!
swatch of treble crochet with a pink handle crochet hook on a gray background

Projects that use Treble Crochet

Once you’ve got the hang of the treble crochet stitch, you can use it in all kinds of crochet projects. It’s especially useful for lace patterns, as it creates a delicate, open fabric. We love using treble crochet in shawls, market bags, and other light, airy designs. 

More Crochet Stitch Tutorials

If you liked this article on double crochet, you might be interested in these related crochet stitch tutorials:

second row of treble crochet worked in teal yarn and a pink crochet hook

How to Treble Crochet Stitch (tr) for Beginners

Yield: 1
Active Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: 1

This step-by-step tutorial will show you how to treble crochet with written instructions, as well as photo demonstrations.

Materials

Tools

Instructions

  1. Start with a slip knot. Chain 14. To make the first treble crochet:
  2. Yarn over twice from back to front, and insert the hook into the fifth chain from the hook.
  3. Yarn over the hook from back to front, and draw the yarn through the center of the chain stitch. You should have four loops on the hook.
  4. Yarn over, and draw the yarn through the first two loops on the hook. You should now have three loops on the hook.
  5. Yarn over, and draw the yarn through the first two loops on the hook. You should now have two loops on the hook.
  6. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through the remaining two loops on the hook. The treble crochet stitch is complete. You should have one loop remaining on the hook.
  7. Continue across the row. Make one double crochet stitch in each of the remaining chain stitches in the foundation chain. (11 stitches)
  8. Make the next row: Turn work, chain 4. Skip the first stitch and work a treble crochet in the second stitch.
  9. Work a treble crochet in each stitch across the row.
  10. Work the last treble crochet of the row in the top of the turning chain from the previous row. (11 stitches.)
  11. Continue making more rows, or fasten off.

Notes

See the post for step-by-step photos and more information.

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