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How to Corner-to-Corner Crochet (C2C) for Beginners

Do you want to learn how to corner-to-corner crochet (C2C)? This popular technique is a great way to make blankets, scarves, and other colorful crochet patterns. This crochet tutorial will show you how to get started with C2C crochet. We will also provide a few tips and tricks to help you improve your skills.

swatch of blue yarn in a c2c crochet pattern

In this article, you’ll learn about C2C increases and decreases, how to read a corner-to-corner crochet graph, and how to change colors. Follow along with this step-by-step photo tutorial, and you’ll be ready to tackle any C2C crochet pattern!

What is corner-to-corner crochet (C2C)?

If you’re new to crochet, you might be wondering what C2C crochet is. C2C stands for corner-to-corner crochet, a type of crochet pattern that’s worked diagonally from one corner to the opposite corner. This crochet technique is often used for making blankets and afghans, but it can also be used to make other items like scarves, shawls, and dishcloths.

Why you should try C2C crochet:

  • C2C crochet is the perfect technique for creating pixel-art style graghans. 
  • C2C crochet is also a great way to use up scraps of yarn. You can change colors every row, or every few rows, to create a colorful and unique project.
  • Don’t feel like using lots of different colors? C2C is perfect for showing off the color changes in variegated yarn.
  • It’s easy to adjust the size of C2C projects – you can easily add more rows to make your project larger. Using the same technique, you can make a small project like a dishcloth or a large project like a crochet blanket.

Now that you know a little bit about C2C crochet, let’s learn how to do it! 

chart showing how to read a c2c graph

The Basic Technique

The C2C technique works a little differently than standard crochet: as the name implies, you start at one corner and work back and forth in diagonal rows until you reach the opposite corner. 

Each diagonal row is made from several “tiles,” also called “squares” or “blocks.” And each tile is made from 3 double crochet stitches, plus their corresponding 3-ch turning chain. 

You’ll start by making the first tile, which will become the bottom-right corner of your project. Then, you’ll work back and forth in diagonal rows, increasing on each side until you reach the widest part of the project. 

Then, you’ll start decreasing the number of tiles per row as you make your way to the top-left corner of the project. 

Don’t worry if this seems a little confusing at first. The hardest part is figuring out the first two rows – after that, you’ll be flying. 

Getting Started with C2C crochet

Make your first swatch along with me, and you’ll get a good grasp of the basic concept. You’ll be ready for your first real C2C project with just a little practice.

Basic Skills to Know First

The C2C technique uses the same basic crochet stitches you might already know. 

  • ch – chain. Chain stitches are used in a turning chain to start each row.
  • dc – double crochet. This is the main stitch used in C2C crochet.
  • sl st – slip stitch. This stitch is used to join one tile to the next.
  • ch-3-sp – chain 3 space. In C2C patterns, the ch-3-sp refers to the space between the turning ch-3 and 1st dc of the tile. I’ll point this out when we get to the step-by-step instructions below.

Other stitches

Less commonly, C2C is done with half double crochet stitches (hdc) instead of double crochet stitches (dc). This is known as mini C2C and is used to create smaller-scale designs. (But for this tutorial, we’ll stick with the more popular C2C technique done with double crochet.)

Supplies You’ll Need

  • Yarn. For this practice swatch, you don’t need anything special. Feel free to use scrap yarn from your stash. As always, I recommend that beginners practice with a smooth, light-colored yarn in a DK or worsted weight.
  • Crochet hook. Choose a hook that is the appropriate size for your yarn. For example, try a size H-8 (5.0 mm) hook if you’ve chosen a worsted weight yarn. 
  • Stitch Marker. Stitch markers are handy for marking the first tile’s right side (front side). That way, you can quickly and easily identify the bottom right corner of your project.

Pattern Notes

  • The pattern is written in US terms. 
  • The first tile will be the bottom-right corner of your project when viewed from the RS (right side).

How to C2C Crochet

Follow along with the picture tutorial below to learn how to make your first C2C swatch.

Step 1: Make the First Tile

  1. Chain 6. Dc in the 4th chain from the hook. Dc in each of the two remaining chains. At this point, you’ll have a small block comprised of the ch-3 turning chain and 3 dc stitches. 

This completes the first tile. 

Step 2: Work Row 2

Turn your work. Row 2 is a WS (wrong side) row, and has two tiles. We’ll start Row 2 by increasing one tile.

  1. Chain 6. Dc in the 4th chain from the hook. Dc in each of the two remaining chains. This completes the first tile of the second row. 
  2. Now, we’ll need to join this tile to the first tile we made. Find the ch-3-space created by the turning-ch-3 on the first tile. Slip stitch into the ch-3-sp from the previous row.
  3. Then, make the next tile. Chain 3. Make 3 dc into that same ch-3-sp.

(In the photos below, you’ll see a small diagram in the bottom-left corner to indicate which tile we’re working on.)

Step 3: Work Row 3

Work Row 3 in the same way that you worked Row 2. Row 3 is a RS (right side) row, and has 3 tiles. You’ll start by making a C2C increase.

  1. Ch 6. DC in the 4th chain from the hook, and in each of the 2 remaining chains. (1 tile complete.)
  2. Sl st into the ch-3-sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (2nd tile complete.)
  3. Sl st into the ch-3 sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (3rd tile complete.)

Step 4: Continue Increasing

Continue following the same pattern. You’ll increase one tile at the beginning of each row until you reach the widest part of your project. For reference:

C2C increase: Chain 6, dc in the 4th ch from the hook, and dc in each remaining chain. 

Note: The traditional way to make a C2C increase is to Ch 6 at the start of the row, and Ch 3 to start each tile (sometimes called the 6:3 method). This makes sense, since we usually chain 3 to start a new row of double crochets. 

But, if your work looks a little too loose or “holey,” you might want to make a shorter turning chain (sometimes called the 5:2 method). To do this, Ch 5 at the beginning of the row and Ch 2 to start each tile. To C2C increase using the 5:2 method, you’d Ch 5 and DC in the 3rd chain from the hook, and in each of the 2 remaining chains.

Step 5: Start Decreasing

Once your project is as wide as you’d like, you’ll start each new Row with a C2C Decrease. 

First Decrease Row: Instead of chaining 6 to make a new tile, we’ll slip stitch across the last tile in the previous row. The slip stitches will move our yarn across the tile without adding height. Then, we’ll chain 3 and work the next tile.

  1. Slip stitch in each dc across, and slip stitch into the ch-3-space.
  2. Chain 3, and work 3 dc into the ch-3-sp of the previous row. (This completes the first tile of this row.)

Repeat this pattern across the row. 

Last tile of the row: Work the last tile of the row, and slip stitch into the next ch-3-space. Don’t chain 3 to start a new tile – instead, turn your work to start the next decrease row.

showing how to end a decrease row of corner to corner crochet

Step 6: Continue working decrease rows.

Continue working row by row, until you come to the last row. 

C2C Decrease: 

  1. Slip stitch in each dc across, and slip stitch into the ch-3-space.
  2. Chain 3, and work 3 dc into the ch-3-sp of the previous row. (This completes the first tile of this row.)

Repeat this pattern across the row.

decreasing the sides of a blue yarn c2c crochet swatch
Sl st in each dc across, and into the ch-3-space.

Step 6: Work the Last Tile

When you come to the last tile, work:

  1. Slip stitch in each dc across, and slip stitch into the ch-3-space.
  2. Ch 3, and work 3 dc into the ch-3-sp of the previous row. (This completes the first tile of this row.)

Now that you’ve finished your C2C s, it’s time to weave in the ends. 

How to Weave in Ends for C2C Crochet

Weaving in the end for a C2C project is similar to weaving in the ends for any other crochet project. The goal is to weave the ends in a way that secures the yarn tails without creating too much bulk.

To weave in the ends: 

  1. Cut the yarn, leaving a six-inch-long tail.
  2. Thread tail onto a tapestry needle. 
  3.  Weave the needle in and out of the stitches on the back side of the work, being careful not to pull too tight.
  4. When you get to the end, cut the yarn close to the work.

For more information, check out this article: How to Weave in the Ends in Crochet

Reading C2C Graphs

Some C2C crochet patterns are given as a written pattern with fully spelled out instructions, but sometimes the pattern is given as a c2c graph. 

C2C graphs (sometimes called C2C charts) are grids that show you which yarn colors to work in each tile. Each square in the chart represents one C2C tile.

chart showing how to read a c2c graph

C2C graphs are most commonly worked from the bottom-right corner to the top-left corner. That means you’ll start your design with the bottom-right tile, and work your way across the chart in diagonal rows, until you reach the top-left tile. 

The graph will have numbers along all four sides to help you keep track of what row you’re on. I like to draw diagonal lines through the chart as I finish each row to help me keep track of what I’ve already crocheted. Crossing off the rows helps me stay a little more organized so I don’t lose my place.

Design Your Own Charts

You can even turn your own designs into C2C charts. You can create your own chart with simple graph paper and colored pencils, or with a website like Stitch Fiddle.

Making Rectangles in C2C

So far, we’ve been talking about how to crochet a C2C square. But what if you want to make a rectangle instead? Good news, it’s really simple.

Let me explain how it works. On a square project, you’ll increase both sides at the same time until you reach the widest part of the project, and then decrease both sides at the same time until you reach the end. This creates a square.

On a rectangular project, you’ll increase on both sides until you reach one corner of the rectangle. You then start decreasing on that side, while still increasing on the other side. This will grow the length of the project without increasing the width. Then, when you reach the next corner, you’ll start decreasing on both sides until you reach the end.

Changing Colors in C2C Crochet

One of the things that makes C2C crochet so fun is that you can easily change colors to create graphic designs. 

There are a few different ways that you can change colors on C2C crochet. But for the most part, you’ll change colors just like you would in any other crochet project.

To change colors in crochet:

  1. Work the last stitch in the old color, but stop crocheting right before you pull through the last two loops of the stitch. Drop the old color of yarn.
  2. Pull the new color of yarn through the last two loops on the hook. Then continue crocheting with the new color.

In C2C, you’ll most often switch colors right before you complete the third double crochet stitch of the tile. Then you’d slip stitch to the ch-3-sp with the new color, and continue with the pattern.

Dealing with Multiple Colors

Changing colors in C2C crochet gets a little trickier when you’re following a pattern made with many different colors. It’s important to stay organized so that your strands of yarn don’t get tangled as you work.

One way to keep your yarn from tangling is to organize your different colors on small bobbins. Or, follow this tutorial to create a DIY bobbin holder for C2C crochet.

Large Blocks of Color

Often, C2C designs have large blocks of color that span multiple rows. In this case, you don’t have to cut the yarn every time you change color.

Instead, you can leave the old color attached so that you can come back to it on the next row. On the next row, when you get back to that section of color, pick up the old color again with the standard color-change technique.

Carrying the Yarn

Another way to make things easier is to reduce the number of yarn changes altogether. You can do this by “carrying” the yarn over to the next section where you’ll use it. To carry the yarn, lay the old color parallel to the row you’re working on and crochet over it to hide it. 

I suggest carrying the yarn if you have a short distance to travel (like 1 or 2 tiles), and only if the color you are carrying will be touching a tile of the same color.

Borders for a C2C Blanket

Now that all your yarn ends are secure, you can think about adding a border to your C2C project to finish it off.

 A simple single crochet border is an easy border you can add to any C2C project. To make one, attach your yarn to a corner with a slip stitch. Then, single crochet evenly around the entire project. I find that 3 sc per tile works well. Then, work three single crochets in each corner to turn the corner.

To make a thicker border, you can work another round of single or double crochet. To do this, simply work one stitch in every single crochet around, crocheting 3 stitches in each corner stitch to turn the corners.

Tips and tricks for improving your C2C skills

Here are a few tips for corner-to-corner crochet. These will help you avoid some of the most common mistakes, and make your C2C projects look even better!

  • Print out the C2C design chart so you can use it as a guide while you work.
  • Highlight or underline the row you’re working on so that it’s easy to see where you are in the pattern. Or, cross out each row as you finish working it.
  • If you’re working with multiple colors, organize your yarn on bobbins or clips. This will help you keep track of your yarn, and keep it from getting tangled.
  • You don’t have to cut the yarn every time you change color. If your design has larger blocks of color, leave the old color attached so that you can come back to it on the next row. On the next row, when you get back to that section of color, pick up the old color again with the standard color-change technique.
  • To reduce the number of color changes you need to make, you can carry your yarn along to the next section where you’ll be using it. I recommend carrying the yarn when you only have to move it over one or two tiles, and only if the color you are carrying will be touching a tile of the same color.

FAQs about Corner to Corner Crochet

Here are some common questions about how to corner-to-corner crochet. If you have a question that’s not listed here, feel free to ask in the comments, and I’ll do my best to answer it.

Can I use any yarn/size hook with C2C crochet?

Yes, you can use any yarn or size hook with C2C crochet. Just be sure to use a hook that’s appropriate for the yarn weight you’re using.

Most C2C patterns are designed for DK weight or worsted weight yarn, so you’ll need a crochet hook in the 4.0mm to 6.5mm range.

My tiles look a little loose, and the ch-3-spaces look a little “holey”.

The traditional way to make a C2C increase is to Ch 6 at the start of the row, and Ch 3 to start each tile. This makes sense, since we usually chain 3 to start a new row of double crochets. But, if your work is looking a little too loose or “holey”, you might want to Ch 5 at the beginning of the row and Ch 2 to start each tile. (This would mean you’d Ch 5 and DC in the 3th chain from the hook, and in each of the 2 remaining chains.)

When working a C2C project, how do I know when to start decreases?

If you’re making a square project, you’ll start decreasing when your project reaches the widest point (which will be the diagonal of the square.) You can start decreasing when your project is as large as you’d like it to be.

How do I make a rectangle in C2C crochet?

To make a rectangle, you’ll start crocheting like usual, increasing on both sides until you reach one corner of the rectangle. You then begin decreasing on that side, while still increasing on the other side. This will grow the length of the project without increasing the width. Then, when you reach the next corner, you’ll start decreasing on both sides until you reach the end.

Do I have to carry the yarn?

No, you don’t have to carry the yarn. You can always cut the yarn and join in a new strand when you need to change colors. Carrying the yarn is just a way to save time and reduce the number of ends you’ll have to weave in at the end.

Examples of C2C Crochet Projects

Now that you’ve mastered the basic technique, here are a few free C2C crochet patterns to try.

Scrappy Corner-to-Corner Blanket. Gather up all of your leftover yarn and make this fun scrap yarn crochet blanket. It’s a quick, colorful pattern that’s perfect for crocheting on the couch.

Corner to Corner Baby Blanket. When you’re ready to try combining the C2C technique with bold colorwork, try this cute Baby Owl Corner-Corner blanket. You’ll use a grid and several colors of yarn to complete the design.

Corner to Corner Afghan. The C2C technique really shines in geometric afghan patterns. In this free pattern, you’ll learn how to create a classic corner to corner (C2C) afghan inspired by modern quilts. You can crochet this blanket in your favorite colors to suit any room in your home.

Corner to Corner Sweater Pattern: This kimono-style sweater crochet pattern proves that C2C can be used for more than just blankets. This sweater pattern is deceptively easy, so it’s perfect for beginners and more intermediate crocheters.

More Crochet Techniques and Tutorials

If you’d like to learn even more about crochet, here are a few more articles you may be interested in.

What’s Next?

Pin this post: Save this tutorial to your Pinterest boards so that you can come back to it later.

Leave a comment: I love to hear your feedback. Tell me in the comments below!

Share on Instagram or Facebook: When you make this project, share it on social media and tag me @sarahmaker. I love to see what you make!

pinterest image with a photo background of a blue crochet swatch

Have questions? Join the Facebook Group!

I hope this article was useful for you! If you have any additional questions, feel free to join my Facebook Group. I created this group for you to share pictures, ask questions, and help each other out.

swatch of blue yarn in a c2c crochet pattern

How to Corner to Corner Crochet (C2C)

Yield: 1
Active Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Difficulty: Easy

Learn how to corner-to-corner crochet (C2C), including C2C increases and decreases, how to read a C2C graph, and how to change colors.

Materials

  • Yarn

Tools

  • Crochet hook
  • Stitch Marker

Instructions

  1. Make the first tile: Chain 6. Dc in the 4th chain from the hook. Dc in each of the two remaining chains. first block of a c2c crochet pattern in blue yarn
  2. Row 2: Turn. Chain 6. Dc in the 4th chain from the hook, dc in each of the two remaining chains. Slip stitch into the ch-3-sp from the previous row. Chain 3. Work 3 dc into that same ch-3-sp. completing row 2 of corner to corner crochet swatch in blue yarn on a gray background
  3. Row 3: Ch 6. DC in the 4th chain from the hook, and in each of the 2 remaining chains. (1 tile complete.) Sl st into the ch-3-sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (2nd tile complete.) Sl st into the ch-3 sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (3rd tile complete.) an incomplete swatch of corner to corner to crochet
  4. Row 4. Ch 6. DC in the 4th chain from the hook, and in each of the 2 remaining chains. (1 tile complete.) Sl st into the ch-3-sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (2nd tile complete.) Sl st into the ch-3 sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (3rd tile complete.) Sl st into the ch-3 sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (4th tile complete.)
  5. Row 5. Decrease: Slip stitch in each dc across, and slip stitch into the ch-3-space. Chain 3, and work 3 dc into the ch-3-sp of the previous row. (This completes the first tile of this row.) Sl st into the ch-3-sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (2nd tile complete.) Sl st into the ch-3 sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (3rd tile complete.) showing how to end a decrease row of corner to corner crochet
  6. Row 6. Decrease: Slip stitch in each dc across, and slip stitch into the ch-3-space. Chain 3, and work 3 dc into the ch-3-sp of the previous row. (This completes the first tile of this row.) Sl st into the ch-3-sp from the previous row. Ch 3, 3 dc into the same ch-3-sp. (2nd tile complete). decreasing the sides of a blue yarn c2c crochet swatch
  7. Row 7. Decrease: Slip stitch in each dc across, and slip stitch into the ch-3-space. Chain 3, and work 3 dc into the ch-3-sp of the previous row. (This completes the only tile in this row.) last tile of a c2c crochet swatch with a crochet hook
  8. Weave in the ends to complete. swatch of blue yarn in a c2c crochet pattern

Notes

  • Print out the C2C design chart so you can use it as a guide while you work.
  • Highlight or underline the row you’re working on so that it’s easy to see where you are in the pattern. Or, cross out each row as you finish working it.
  • If you’re working with multiple colors, organize your yarn on bobbins or clips. This will help you keep track of your yarn, and keep it from getting tangled.

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