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How to Weave in the Ends in Crochet

Weaving in the ends of your yarn is an important step in finishing any crochet project. You’ll want to learn how to weave in your yarn ends properly so that your project doesn’t unravel when you wash it or wear it.

In this tutorial, we will show you how to weave in the ends using a simple technique that is easy to follow. After completing these steps, your crochet projects will be finished securely and will look polished and professional!

crochet fabric in green yarn on a gray background

What is “weaving in the ends”?

Weaving in the ends is a technique used to secure the loose ends of yarn at the end of a crochet project. This prevents the yarn from unraveling over time and ensures your project looks neat and professional.

There are several ways to weave in the ends, but in this tutorial, we will show you an easy method that anyone can follow.

Why is it important?

Weaving in the ends may seem like a tedious task, but it’s an essential part of any crochet project.

Weaving in the ends is important because it prevents your project from unraveling when you wear or wash it. After spending all that crocheting a project, you’ll want to make sure it lasts for years to come!

Why not just use a knot?

You could use a knot to secure the ends of the yarn, but it’s not the best method for finishing your project. Knots can come undone over time and create hard bumps that don’t feel very nice to wear. In contrast, securely woven ends feel smooth to the touch, and will not come loose with wear or washing.

Basic Supplies You’ll Need

To weave in the ends, you’ll need a finished project and a tapestry needle (sometimes called a darning needle or a yarn needle).

And as far as what’s the right time to weave in the ends? Most crocheters weave in the ends before blocking and seaming, but some prefer to weave in the ends after blocking.

Types of tapestry needles

Tapestry needles are used to weave the yarn tails into the crochet fabric, hiding the ends. Tapestry needles come in different varieties: plastic and metal, large and small, straight-tip and bent-tip.

Material: Plastic needles are inexpensive and great for kids, while steel needles are more durable and slick.

Size: As far as size goes, you’ll want to choose a needle that is thin enough to fit through the stitches of your project, but large enough so that the yarn can easily be pulled through the eye of the needle.

Shape: What about straight tip vs. bent tip needles? It’s really a personal preference. I suggest picking up a multi-pack of needles so that you can find the type that works best for you.

How to weave in the ends

Once you’ve chosen the right tapestry needle, it’s time to start weaving in the ends.

Cut the yarn. After you finish off the last stitch of your project, cut the yarn leaving a long tail. You’ll want to leave at least 6″ of yarn to weave in.

Thread the needle. Then, thread the yarn tail through the eye of the tapestry needle.

Now, before you start weaving in the ends, consider the type of project you’ll be weaving it into. Weave in the ends on the wrong side of the work if possible. Or, if you’re working on a project where both sides will show, do your best to hide them as much as possible.

In general, you’ll weave the ends horizontally through the base of the stitches, or down vertically through the post of taller stitches. Work up and down and side to side, changing directions a few times to ensure that the ends won’t come out.

Start by weaving horizontally through the previous row.
  1. To start, weave the yarn horizontally through several stitches. Try weaving it through the dense base of single crochet stitches, where it’s less likely to be visible.
  2. Then, change directions, and run the needle through a few stitches vertically. Then, change direction again, and weave it back through a few more stitches horizontally.
  3. When you’re done, pull the yarn snug, and cut the yarn tail close to the surface of the fabric. Then, stretch out the fabric again, which will hide the end.

Continue doing this until you’ve woven all of the loose ends.

Weaving in the ends with a crochet hook

If you find yourself without a tapestry needle, you can weave in the ends with a crochet hook. To do this, weave your crochet hook through the crochet fabric where you’d normally weave the tapestry needle. Then catch the end of the yarn with the hook, and pull the yarn through.

How to weave in the ends for granny squares (multiple colors)

If you’re working with multiple colors, you’ll need to weave in the ends for each color separately. Weave the ends of Color A through the stitches worked in the same Color A – that way, the ends will be less likely to show.

Weaving in bulky yarn

It can be harder to hide the ends of bulky or super-bulky yarn. Since this type of yarn is thicker, it has the tendency to show. One thing you can do to hide bulkier yarns is to split them into plies, and weave in each ply separately.

Tips for weaving in the ends

Here are a few tips for weaving in the ends:

  • Use a tapestry needle for a neat and professional-looking finish.
  • Weave the yarn in and out of the fabric in several different directions to secure it.
  • Be careful not to weave the yarn in too tightly, or you might pucker your fabric.
  • If you’re using multiple colors, be sure to weave in the ends for each color separately. Weave in the ends through a section with the same color to make the weaving as invisible as possible.

FAQs about Weaving in the Ends

Here are some common questions that crocheters ask about weaving in the ends.

When should you weave in the ends?

Ideally, you should weave in the ends as soon as you finish your project – or at least before you wash and wear it for the first time. This will prevent the yarn from unraveling over time.

Some crocheters prefer to weave in the ends before blocking, and some prefer to weave in the ends after blocking. This decision will depend on how much you expect your project to change with the blocking process. Some factors to consider are the type of yarn you’re using, and the stitch pattern.

What is the best way to weave in the ends?

The best way to weave in the ends is with a tapestry needle. Either straight tapestry needles or bent-tip tapestry needles will work well.

Can you weave in the ends with a crochet hook?

You can weave in the ends with a crochet hook in a pinch. However, I don’t recommend it because it can be hard to weave a thicker crochet hook through the stitches.

What are some common mistakes people make when weaving in the ends?

One common mistake is to weave the yarn in too tightly. This can cause the fabric of your project to pucker. Another mistake is to weave the yarn in only one direction. This can cause the yarn to come undone, and your project may unravel over time.

More Crochet Tutorials

If you like to learn more about crochet, check out these beginner-friendly tutorials.

What’s Next?

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tapestry needle threaded with green yarn weaving in the ends of a crochet project

How to Weave in the Ends in Crochet

Yield: 1
Active Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Difficulty: Easy

Learn how to finish your latest crochet project with this step-by-step tutorial about weaving in your yarn ends. You'll learn the best way to weave in your ends so that they stay secure and don't unravel with wear or washing.

Materials

  • crochet project

Tools

  • tapestry needle

Instructions

  1. Cut the yarn leaving at least a 6″ yarn tail to weave in. Then, thread the yarn tail through the eye of the tapestry needle. crochet fabric in green yarn on a gray background
  2. Weave the yarn horizontally through the base of several stitches in the row you just completed. weaving in the yarn on a piece of crochet fabric in green yarn on a gray background
  3. Then, change directions, and run the needle through a few stitches vertically. tapestry needle weaving in the ends crochet fabric in green yarn on a gray background
  4. Then, change direction again, and weave it back through a few more stitches horizontally in the opposite direction. silver needle weaving in the yarn tails on a crochet fabric in green yarn on a gray background
  5. Continue doing this until you’ve woven all of the loose ends. weaving in the yarn ends with green yarn on a swatch of green crochet fabric

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