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How to Crochet the Granny Stripe Stitch

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In this tutorial, I’ll teach you how to crochet the classic granny stripe stitch. This versatile stitch is great for blankets, scarves, cardigans, and more. Let’s get started!

granny stitch swatch in gold, teal, and cream yarn

Go-To Granny Stripe

I absolutely love the granny stripe stitch. It’s one of those classic crochet stitches that never goes out of style. It’s easy and quick to make, incredibly satisfying to work up, and looks great in lots of different projects.

Highlights

Some key things to know about the granny stripe stitch:

  • The granny stripe stitch is made up of 3-dc clusters worked in rows.
  • Work in the spaces between clusters, not in the tops of stitches
  • Alternate between just two rows (Rows 3 and 4) to create the pattern

A Closer Look at the Granny Stripe Stitch

The granny stripe stitch, also known as the straight granny stitch, is a wonderfully simple stitch pattern made up of double crochet clusters. 

Unlike granny squares that are worked in rounds, the granny stripe stitch is worked in horizontal rows. In each row, you’ll work clusters into the spaces between the clusters from the previous row. This offset, open texture is what gives granny stripe its signature look.

Techniques to Know First

Granny stitch is made with just a few basic crochet stitches. Before diving into the granny stripe, ensure you’re comfortable with the following techniques:

How to Crochet the Granny Stripe Stitch

Now that we’ve brushed up on the basics, let’s learn how to crochet the granny stripe stitch step-by-step.

Materials

Abbreviations

Special Stitches

dc-cluster: 3 double crochet stitches in the same stitch

Notes

  • This pattern uses US terms.
  • Start by chaining a multiple of 3 + 2
  • Use a turning chain of 2 for the dc-cluster rows. Ch-2 counts as a stitch.
  • To work in the space between the clusters: Do not work into the tops of the stitches, but rather insert the hook into the space between the dc-clusters from the previous row.

Instructions

  1. Chain a multiple of 3 + 2 stitches. (For this swatch, I’ve chained 17.)
  2. Row 1 (RS): Sc in 2nd ch from hook and each ch across. Turn. (16 sts)
  3. Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc), dc in first st, *sk 2 sts, dc-cluster in next st; rep from * across to last 3 sts, sk 2 sts, 2 dc in last st. Turn. (16 sts)
  4. Row 3: Ch 2 (counts as dc), *dc-cluster in next sp between clusters; rep from * across to last st, 1 dc in last st (top of the turning chain). Turn. (17 sts)
  5. Row 4: Ch 2 (counts as dc), dc in first st, *dc-cluster in next sp between clusters; rep from * across to last st, 2 dc in last st (top of the turning chain). Turn. (16 sts)
  6. Repeat Rows 3-4 to the desired length.

And that’s it! Just alternate those last two pattern rows to create the granny stripe stitch.

Tip: To change colors in granny stripe, work up until the last yarn over of the last stitch of the row. Yarn over with the new color, and continue on.

Granny Stripe Stitch Chart

symbol chart for granny stripe crochet stitch

Variations on the Granny Stripe Stitch

There are different ways to crochet this stitch.

  1. Add chains between the clusters. Some patterns will instruct you to chain 1 or 2 chain stitches between dc-clusters. This creates an even more open fabric.
  2. Start with/without a row of single crochet. I like to crochet a base row of single crochet to form a nice, sturdy edge. But you certainly don’t have to. If you prefer, you can work your first row of dc-clusters directly into the starting chain.
  3. Start with a different number of chains. You can make your project wider by starting with a larger number of chains. Just make sure that you use a multiple of 3 + 2.

Tips and Tricks

  • Play with different color combos to create fun stripes in your project
  • Weave in ends as you go to minimize finishing work.
  • Use a stitch marker to mark the top of the turning chain if you have trouble finding it.

FAQs

What are some other names for this stitch?

The granny stripe stitch is also known as granny stitch, flat granny stitch, or straight granny stitch. Despite the different names, they all refer to the same stitch pattern.

What does “sk 2 sts” mean?

Sk 2 sts means to skip the next 2 stitches and work into the stitch after that. This creates the spaces between the clusters.

How many chains do I start with?

Chain a multiple of 3 + 2 stitches. For example, you could use 32, 62, even 92 chains for a starting chain.

Do I work into the stitches or clusters for Rows 3/4?

For Rows 3 and 4 you work into the spaces between the clusters, not into the tops of stitches.

What is a good starter project for this stitch?

The granny stripe stitch is perfect for beginner-friendly projects like scarves, cowls, and blankets.

What stitch do you recommend for the border?

A single crochet border complements the granny stripe stitch nicely.

More Crochet Stitch Tutorials

After learning the granny stitch, try one of these other crochet stitch tutorials!

granny stitch swatch in gold, teal, and cream yarn

How to Crochet the Granny Stitch

Yield: 1
Active Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: 1

Learn how to crochet the classic granny stripe stitch.

Materials

  • yarn

Tools

  • crochet hook
  • tapestry needle
  • scissors

Instructions

  1. Chain a multiple of 3 + 2 stitches. (For this swatch, I've chained 17.)
  2. Row 1 (RS): Sc in 2nd ch from hook and each ch across. Turn. (16 sts)
  3. Row 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc), dc in first st, *sk 2 sts, dc-cluster in next st; rep from * across to last 3 sts, sk 2 sts, 2 dc in last st. Turn. (17 sts)
  4. Row 3: Ch 2 (counts as dc), *dc-cluster in next sp between clusters; rep from * across to last st, 1 dc in last st (top of the turning chain). Turn. (17 sts)
  5. Row 4: Ch 2 (counts as dc), dc in first st, *dc-cluster in next sp between clusters; rep from * across to last st, 2 dc in last st (top of the turning chain). Turn. (17 sts)
  6. Repeat Rows 3-4 to the desired length.

Notes

  • This pattern uses US terms.
  • Start by chaining a multiple of 3 + 2
  • Use a turning chain of 2 for the dc-cluster rows. Ch-2 counts as a stitch.
  • To work in the space between the clusters: Do not work into the tops of the stitches, but rather insert the hook into the space between the dc-clusters from the previous row.
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    Dani

    Sunday 18th of February 2024

    Hello, I’m confused, the number of stitches on the chain is 17, but after row 1 the stitches decrease to 16, and then after row 2 they go back up to 17 again? Or should they stay at 16? Thanks!

    Sarah Stearns

    Monday 19th of February 2024

    Yes, there are 17 chains. But since you make the first sc in the second chain from the hook, there will only be 16 sc in the first row. Row 2 (and all other even rows) will have 16 sts as well, but Row 3 (and all other odd rows) will have 17 stitches.

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