Skip to Content

Free Crochet Ripple Baby Blanket Pattern

This post may contain affiliate links.

A handmade crochet baby blanket is warm, cozy, and practical. More than that, it’s a treasured keepsake for your little one or a cherished gift that any new parent would appreciate. In this article, learn how to crochet a quick and easy baby blanket with a colorful ripple pattern. We’ll teach you everything you need to crochet a baby blanket (even if it’s your first time!) and walk you through the free pattern, step-by-step.

pink and purple crochet baby blanket over the back of a brown wooden chair

Prefer the PDF version?

Grab the ad-free, printable PDF pattern. Download and print at home, or view on your computer, tablet, or smartphone.

photo collage of crochet baby blanket pattern displayed on tablet and smartphone

Free Crochet Baby Blanket Pattern

With its delightful ridged wavy pattern, this Ripple Baby Blanket is a colorful baby blanket design that works up quickly – perfect for last-minute baby shower gifts!

Whether you’re an experienced crocheter or just starting out, this comprehensive guide will teach you how to crochet a baby blanket. We’ll start by discussing the necessary supplies for this project and the crochet stitches and techniques you’ll need to know to create the ripple pattern.

After that, we’ll walk you through the pattern with step-by-step photos and instructions. We’ll finish up with a section on helpful tips and techniques, and answer some frequently asked questions about crocheting baby blankets.

Is this pattern a good choice for beginners?

Yes! I love recommending this project, particularly for beginners, because the ripple pattern is constructed using simple, basic stitches. It’s an excellent way to practice these stitches while creating something truly beautiful.

The pattern is easy to memorize and works up fast. Plus, color changes are a breeze if you use the self-striping yarn we recommend.

If you’re new to crochet, you might want to start with our How to Crochet guide or our tutorial on the 6 basic crochet stitches that beginners should learn first.

So, are you ready to create a beautiful ripple baby blanket? Let’s dive in!

crochet increases as part of the ripple pattern in purple yarn on a gray background

Supplies You’ll Need

First off, we need to gather our supplies. Like most baby blanket patterns, you only need basic crochet supplies: yarn, a hook, scissors, and a tapestry needle.

Choosing Yarn

We chose a super soft acrylic yarn called Lion Brand Mandala Ombre for this blanket. It’s a category 4 worsted-weight yarn and comes in a variety of tonal and multi-colored shades. We love it because it’s easy to work with and produces a soft, squishy blanket.

Another reason we chose this yarn is for its long color changes. Self-striping yarns with long color changes make it super easy to create striped blankets. The yarn does the color changing for you, meaning fewer yarn ends to weave in later!

Choosing a Crochet Hook

We’ll use a US-size I-9 (5.5 mm) hook for our ripple blanket. I recommend this Clover Amour hook for its smooth surface and ergonomic handle.

Remember to check your gauge to ensure your blanket turns out the same size as ours. If your gauge is too tight, try a larger hook. Or, if your gauge is too loose, try a smaller hook.

Notions and Other Tools

You’ll also need a pair of scissors, a measuring tape or gauge ruler, and a tapestry needle for weaving in ends. Stitch markers aren’t strictly necessary, but they can come in handy for keeping track of your stitches.

close up of ripple texture on pink and purple baby blanket

Understanding the Ripple Pattern

Now, let’s talk about the stitch pattern we’ll use in this baby blanket. This soft, wavy variation on the ripple stitch may look complicated at first glance, but it’s really quite simple once you get the hang of it.

Here are the basic stitches and terms you’ll need to know before tackling the ripple pattern:

  • Back Loop Only (blo): To crochet into the back loop only, insert your hook into just the back loop of the stitch (the loop furthest from you), then complete your stitch as usual. Working under the back loop creates a subtle ridge on the front of the fabric, adding an interesting visual detail to the blanket.
  •  Chain stitch: To make a chain stitch, yarn over and pull a new loop of yarn through the loop that was on your hook. Repeat for as many chain stitches as needed.
  •  Half Double Crochet (hdc): To make a half double crochet, yarn over, insert your hook into the stitch, yarn over again, and pull up a loop. Yarn over one more time and pull through all three loops.
  •  Hdc Increase: To make a hdc increase, simply make two half double crochet stitches in the same stitch. The increases create the “peaks” in the ripple pattern.
  •  Hdc Decrease (hdc2tog): Hdc2tog stands for “half double crochet two together,” which is a decrease stitch. This stitch creates the “valleys” in your ripple pattern.

Ripple Pattern: Now, let’s walk through the ripple pattern itself. Each repeat of the ripple goes like this:

“2 hdc-blo increases, 4 hdc-blo decreases, 2 hdc-blo increases”

In a written crochet pattern, the instructions would look something like this:

“2 hdc-blo into each of the next 2 stitches, hdc2tog-blo four times, 2 hdc-blo into each of the next 2 stitches.”

For more help, check out our guide to reading and understanding crochet patterns.

close up of ripple stitch for a baby blanket with stitches labeled

Stitch multiple: The stitch multiple for this ripple pattern is 12 + 2. That means that each ripple, from peak to peak, is 12 stitches wide. If you want to make a larger blanket, add more starting chains in multiples of 12. Then, add an extra 2 stitches for the first turning chain.

Reversible: Yes! Both sides of this blanket look the same.

Tips for Changing Color in Crochet

If you use a self-striping yarn, color changes are easy. Each length of color in the Mandala Ombre yarn should be enough to crochet 3 complete rows, plus or minus a few stitches. You can let the color changes happen as they come. Or, if you really want to be precise, you can snip the yarn at the end of the third row, move the yarn up to the start of the next color, and rejoin the yarn.

Note: I needed 4 skeins of yarn to complete this blanket because I did cut out a few sections of yarn to make the stripes line up like I wanted. If you don’t care about making the stripe sequences line up perfectly, you’ll be able to complete the blanket with only 3 skeins of yarn.

You don’t have to use self-striping yarn, of course! Feel free to create your own stripe sequence with the yarn of your choice.

To change color: Work the last stitch in the old color, stopping just before the last yarn over. Yarn over with the new color, and draw through the loops on the hook to complete the stitch. Then, continue with the new color. (For more details, check out this complete article about how to change color in crochet.)

Prefer the PDF version?

Grab the ad-free, printable PDF pattern. Download and print at home, or view on your computer, tablet, or smartphone.

photo collage of crochet baby blanket pattern displayed on tablet and smartphone

Crochet Ripple Baby Blanket Pattern

Here is a free pattern for a striped ripple baby blanket that you can use to practice your skills. This particular pattern makes a squishy, cozy, baby blanket that’s perfect for playing and snuggling. You can customize the look of this blanket by choosing a different shade of ombre yarn, or combining your own set of yarns to create a unique stripe pattern.

Pattern Details

Skill Level: Beginner – Easy

Finished Size: 30 in by 36 in

Materials: 4 skeins (21.2 oz / 1376 yards) of Lion Brand Ombre Mandala, in the shade Felicity. You could get away with 3 skeins (15.9 oz / 1032 yards) if you don’t try to line up the stripes.

Hook: US Size I-9 (5.5 mm)

Other Supplies: tapestry needle, measuring tape, stitch markers (optional)

Gauge: 19 stitches in hdc-blo ripple pattern = 4 in (10cm)

Or, 2 pattern repeats (24 sts total) = 5 in (12.5 cm)

When you match the gauge, your project will be the same size as described in the pattern.

Stitch Abbreviations

  • ch/s: chains
  •  hdc: half double crochet
  •  hdc-blo: half double crochet back loop only
  •  hdc2tog: half double crochet two together
  •  hdc2tog-blo: half double crochet two together, back loop only
  •  st/s: stitch/es

Special Stitches

Invisible HDC Decrease: For this pattern, I recommend a variation on the standard hdc2tog called the “Invisible hdc2tog-blo.”

  • Yarn over, and insert your hook in the back loop of the next stitch. (3 loops on the hook)
  •  Do not yarn over, but insert your hook through the back loop of the next stitch. (4 loops on the hook)
  •  Yarn over, and pull the yarn through the first 2 loops. (3 loops on the hook)
  •  Yarn over, and pull the yarn through all 3 loops on your hook. (1 loop on the hook)

 Pattern Notes

  • The pattern is written using US terms.
  •  The blanket is worked in one piece, in rows.
  •  The turning chain-2 does not count as a stitch. 
  •  All stitches are made in the back loop only, except the first and last increase of each row, which are made under both loops.
  •  Use an ombre-type yarn to create stripes as you go. Or, change yarn colors every 3rd row to create stripes.

Blanket Instructions

Starting Chain. Ch 146.

Row 1: 2 hdc in 3rd ch from hook, 2 hdc in the next ch, hdc2tog 4 times, *2 hdc in each of the next 4 chs, hdc2tog 4 times; repeat from * across until the last 2 ch. 2 hdc in each of the last 2 ch. Turn. (144 sts)

Note: All stitches are made in the back loops only, except the first and last increase of each row, which are made under both loops for a sturdier edge.

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as a stitch). 2 hdc in the first st, 2 hdc-blo in the next st, hdc2tog-blo 4 times, *2 hdc-blo in each of the next 4 sts, hdc2tog-blo 4 times; repeat from * across until the last 2 sts. 2 hdc-blo in the second to last st, 2 hdc in the last st. Turn. (144 sts)

Repeat row 2, changing colors every 3rd row.

Finishing: Fasten off, and weave in ends.

pink and purple ripple crochet baby blanket on a gray background

Tips for a Successful Blanket

Here are a few blanket-making tips and techniques that I’ve learned over the years.

Try for Consistent Tension

Consistent tension is the key to a professional-looking result when it comes to crocheting. Maintaining an even tension takes practice – don’t worry if you don’t get it right immediately. Practice, as they say, makes perfect!

Take Breaks

I find crocheting to be the most fun when I’m working in a comfortable, well-lit space. Taking regular short breaks helps to prevent hand cramping and keeps me engaged in the project.

Block Your Blanket

Blocking adds a nice finishing touch to your ripple baby blanket. To block your blanket, gently wet it and lay it flat on a towel or blocking mat, shaping the blanket as desired. Allow it to air dry completely. This might seem like an extra step, but it’s well worth it.

Frequently Asked Questions

I’ve received plenty of questions over the years, and chances are, some of these FAQs might be on your mind as well.

What to do if the edges are uneven?

Even though we’re working with a ripple pattern, the edges of your blanket should stay relatively straight. If you find your edges are becoming uneven, it might mean that your stitch count is inconsistent from row to row. Perhaps you’ve skipped a stitch or added an extra one accidentally – it happens to all of us.

To prevent this from happening, count your stitches regularly and double-check your work at the end of each row. If something seems off, don’t be afraid to unravel a bit and fix the issue.

What’s the difference between a ripple stitch and a chevron stitch?

In my mind, a ripple stitch has smoother peaks and valleys, while a chevron stitch has more pointed peaks and valleys. That said, there are lots of variations on the ripple and chevron stitch patterns. And, you’ll find crochet patterns online that use these terms interchangeably.

How to fix a missed stitch in the ripple pattern?

Skip an increase or a decrease? No worries. Most crochet mistakes can be easily fixed! Just unravel your work until you reach the mistake, correct it, and then continue.

Can I adjust the size of the blanket?

Absolutely! The beauty of this pattern is its flexibility. You can easily adjust the width of the blanket by adding or subtracting stitches from your foundation chain. Just remember to follow the 12+2 stitch multiple when calculating the number of chains. In other words, you’ll need 12 chains for each repeat, plus 2 additional chains for the first turning chain.

Then, you can adjust the length of the blanket by crocheting more or fewer rows.

More Free Crochet Patterns

After you crochet this baby blanket, here are some more free crochet patterns to try!

What’s Next?

Pin this post: Save this tutorial to your Pinterest boards so that you can come back to it later.

Leave a comment: We love to hear your feedback. Tell me in the comments below!

Share on Instagram or Facebook: When you make this project, share it on social media and tag me @sarahmaker_. We love to see what you make!

Have questions? Join the Facebook Group!

We hope this article was useful for you! If you have any additional questions, feel free to join my Facebook Group. We created this group for you to share pictures, ask questions, and help each other out.

pink and purple crochet baby blanket over the back of a brown wooden chair

Crochet Ripple Baby Blanket

Yield: 1

Here is a free pattern for a striped ripple baby blanket that you can use to practice your skills. This particular pattern makes a squishy, cozy, baby blanket that’s perfect for playing and snuggling. You can customize the look of this blanket by choosing a different shade of ombre yarn, or combining your own set of yarns to create a unique stripe pattern.

Materials

  • Lion Brand Mandala Ombre Yarn, Felicity

Tools

  • US size I-9 (5.5mm) crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Gauge ruler or measuring tape
  • Tapestry needle

Instructions

  1. Starting Chain. Ch 146.
  2. Row 1: 2 hdc in 3rd ch from hook, 2 hdc in the next ch, hdc2tog 4 times, *2 hdc in each of the next 4 chs, hdc2tog 4 times; repeat from * across until the last 2 ch. 2 hdc in each of the last 2 ch. Turn. (144 sts)
  3. Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as a stitch). 2 hdc in the first st, 2 hdc-blo in the next st, hdc2tog-blo 4 times, *2 hdc-blo in each of the next 4 sts, hdc2tog-blo 4 times; repeat from * across until the last 2 sts. 2 hdc-blo in the second to last st, 2 hdc in the last st. Turn. (144 sts)
  4. Repeat row 2, changing colors every 3rd row.
  5. Finishing: Fasten off, and weave in ends.

Notes

Note: The pattern is written using US terms. All stitches are made in the back loops only, except the first and last increase of each row, which are made under both loops for a sturdier edge.

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Did you make this project?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

Philip Moore

Tuesday 20th of February 2024

Hi Sarah! Out of curiosity, are the dimensions listed LxW or WxL? I'm making an adjustment and adding a big block of sc stitches in the middle so I can sew in a name and wanted to make sure my proportions come out similar. Thanks!

Philip Moore

Thursday 22nd of February 2024

@Sarah Stearns, thanks for your response! That'll help me sort out how to factor in the extra length.

Sarah Stearns

Wednesday 21st of February 2024

Hi Philip, It's 30" wide and 36" long.

Jessica

Saturday 4th of November 2023

Hi! This pattern is beautiful and definitely the one I want to use, thank you so much sharing it with us! However, the yarn that I need to use for it is different. I have the Bernat Blanket super bulky. Do you have any advice on making the adjustment?

Sarah Stearns

Monday 6th of November 2023

Hi Jessica, I think the main thing you'll need to accomodate is the different gauge you'll get with the super bulky yarn. I suggest making a gauge swatch with one or two pattern repeats, and measuring how wide it is. That way you can calculate how many pattern repeats you'll need for the size blanket you want.

Bettye

Tuesday 26th of September 2023

Hi Sarah, I’m trying to make the ripple blanket and am confused about the first row. When it says hdc2tog 4 times is that in one ch?…. Or over 4 Chs. I’d appreciate your help. Bettye to

Sarah Stearns

Wednesday 27th of September 2023

Hi Bettye, Thanks for your question. The 4 hdc2tog are worked over 8 chains. Each hdc2tog is worked over 2 chains.

Emelia

Thursday 17th of August 2023

Hello,your pattern is super cute! How many yards does it use? Thanks!

Emelia

Saturday 19th of August 2023

@Sarah Stearns,

Okay, did you every bit of those 4 skeins? :)

Sarah Stearns

Friday 18th of August 2023

Hi, I used 4 skeins Lion Brand Ombre Mandala, which would be 1376 yards.

Chris W.

Saturday 3rd of June 2023

Absolutely LOVE your yarn choices! Doing the ripple pattern has always been one of my favorites because it seems to come together so fast - you see results quickly. Thank you so much for all the patterns you make available to us.

Skip to Instructions